Bio

Robert Rubinstein
Storyteller    Actor    Writer    Teacher
rrubinsteinstorytelling@gmail.com

 

NOTABLE PERFORMANCES & WORKSHOPS

  • Member of the Nu Wa National Storytelling Delegation to China
  • Boston Public Library
  • Atlanta Hebrew School Academies
  • Linn-Benton Community College teacher workshop
  • Northwest Folklife Festival - Seattle
  • New York Public Library
  • Congregation Beth Elohim - Brooklyn
  • Eastern Tennessee State - storytelling workshop  
  • Recipient of an ORACLE Award from the 2001 National Storytelling Network
  • Featured in the National Education Association Magazine, October 2001 
  • Presented workshops in "Using and Teaching Humor and Laughter to reduce violence, stress and enhance curriculum
  • Presented workshops and performances at the 2001 Conference on Alternatives in Jewish Education at Colorado State University
  • Invited to perform at the 2000 National Storytelling Festival in Tennessee 
  • Presented workshops and performances at the 2000 Conference on Alternatives in Jewish Education at Hofstra University, New York
  • Presented workshops, including a teen panel, and performances at the 1999 Conference on Alternatives  in Jewish Education at Ohio State University
  • Presented workshops and performances at the 1998 Conference on Alternatives in Jewish Education in San Antonio, Texas
  • Named "Jewish Performer for the month of June" by the National Jewish Entertainment Network
  • Featured performer for Portland's 2001 "Tapestry of Tales"
  • Presented at the National Storytelling Conference in Seattle, 1994
  • Performed as a storyteller in Boston, Atlanta, Nashville, Vancouver-B.C., Berkley, Oregon State Library Conference, Proctor & Gamble, Young Writers Conference, Eugene Ballet
  • Listed in Who's Who Among America's Teachers: 1994-1997
  • Founder and Director (1969-1994) of the nationally-known Troupe of Tellers, from Roosevelt Middle School, in Eugene, Oregon
  • Founder, Producer, and Director of Eugene's Multi-Cultural Storytelling Festival (1990 - 2010)

Robert Rubinstein

Robert Rubinstein opened the Claremont College TEDx Talk, “UnnexpectedNarrative,” with his presentation, “Empowering students through storytelling.” Robert has performed at the New York Public Library; Boston Public Library, Northwest Folklife Festival in Seattle, schools in Atlanta, and traveled with 41 storytellers from across the nation to China.  He has also presented workshops at the National Storytelling Conference in Denver. His recordings include his STRANGE TALES FROM BIBLICAL TIMES, THE ROOSTER WHO WOULD BE KING AND OTHER HEALING TALES and TALES OF MYSTERY/TALES OF TERROR!

Robert Rubinstein’s latest book is TWISTED WORDS & STRANGE IDEAS! –Humorous Writings by Young People.    ZISHE THE STRONGMAN, published by Kar-Ben Books, was selected by PJ Library for three years in a row to be distributed nationally to Jewish children, 4-8 years-old, and will now be included in a Spanish translation as part of the new PJ Library program in Mexico.  Robert also wrote CURTAINS UP! THEATRE GAMES & STORYTELLING - using theatre games for skill-building and curriculum enhancement. HINTS FOR TEACHING SUCCESS IN MIDDLE SCHOOL received a three-column rave review in MIddle Ground, the national middle school magazine. He has also written two young adult novels: WHO WANTS TO BE A HERO! and WHEN SIRENS SCREAMHERO was made into a movie for "Showtime" TV. His short stories appear in Peninnah Schrams´ CHOSEN TALES: STORIES TOLD BY JEWISH STORYTELLERS, in THE GHOST & I, in SACRED STONES, and in Eric Kimmel's award-winning WONDERS & MIRACLES.

Robert directed the nationally-known "Troupe of Tellers" from Roosevelt Middle School in Eugene, Oregon. During its 24 years, these troupes performed for some 70,000 Oregon students and at the 1993 National Storytelling Conference. He originated and directed Eugene's annual Multi-Cultural Storytelling Festival, which, for 20 years, brought well-known tellers representing different ethnic and minority groups to the Eugene area to tell to over 7,000 students in the schools annually. This festival was meant to be a positive way to further cultural appreciation and understanding through story. During its twenty-year run, 57 storytellers from a wide variety of ethnic peoples visited over 130,000 students in the schools.